Spotify's Ultimate Workout Playlist

If you’re struggling to get fit, it could be because you’re listening to the wrong kind of music during your workout.  Sports psychologists from Brunel University have discovered that specific genres of music are best suited to specific types of exercise.  The researchers analyzed 6.7 million Spotify playlists in their study. They now believe urban music, is perfect for running.  Pop music is perfect for slower tasks including aerobic warm up and cool down.  Dance music is best suited to strength and weight training because it is fast, rhythmical, and full of bass.  Rock music should be avoided during cardio and high-intensity workouts because the different changes in tempo can affect a person’s rhythm.

Here is Brunel University and Spotify’s Ultimate Workout Playlist: 

(BPM stands for beats per minute). 

  • Mental preparation: Roar – Katy Perry (92 BPM)
  • Stretching: Talk Dirty – Jason Derulo (100 BPM)
  • Stretching: Skip to the Good Bit – Rizzle Kicks (105 BPM)
  • Warm-up: Get Lucky – Daft Punk (116 BPM)
  • Aerobic warm-up: Move – Little Mix (120 BPM)
  • Cardio training (low intensity): Need U 100% – Duke Dumont (124 BPM)
  • Cardio training (low intensity): You Make Me – Avicii (125 BPM)
  • Cardio training: Timber – Pitbull ft. Ke$ha (130 BPM)
  • Cardio training (high intensity): Applause – Lady Gaga (140 BPM)
  • Cardio training (very high intensity): Can’t Hold Us – Macklemore & Ryan Lewis (147 BPM)
  • Cardio training (very high intensity): Happy – Pharrell Williams (160 BPM)
  • Strength training: The Monster by Eminem ft. Rihanna (110 BPM)
  • Strength training: Love Me Again – John Newman (126 BPM)

 

 

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